Year: 2020

New link for Bromfield Parish Council extraordinary meeting on closure of post office, tomorrow (Tuesday) 18:30 on Zoom

With apologies, I have had to move the online meeting for Bromfield Parish Council tomorrow night (14 July). This is because I had set the original meeting up on a free account, not my paid account. The free account would have limited the meeting to 40 minutes. The new link to join the Zoom meeting is https://bit.ly/BromfieldPO. The meeting begins at six thirty in the evening and will end by 8 o’clock at the latest. I’m aiming for 7.30pm Ludlow Farmshop has sent an explanation on why it will be closing the post office and village shop. I reproduce this below. My aim in calling the meeting is to seek clarity on the proposals and to hear the views of people who use the post office and shop. I hope to see you online.

Temeside to be closed near former gasworks for a month from 20 July for essential gas mains work

We are enduring a summer of road closures. King Street will remain closed for the foreseeable future on Fridays and Saturdays between 10am and 3pm on Fridays and Saturdays. Julian Road is closed at present for urgent repairs to a sewer that has created a small sinkhole. While that road is closed, the nine-month closure of Sandpits Road for a complete renewal of all utilities can’t begin. This is expected to get underway on Thursday. Coming up next Monday, we have the closure of Temeside for gas main works. This will be a 24-hour road closure between Weeping Cross and Old Street. It is scheduled for four weeks ending 14 August.

Former cat rescue shop on Old Street, Ludlow, could be converted into a café with flats above

Woodspace Partners Ltd has applied to use the ground floor of 5 Old Street as a café. The space above will be converted into four flats. The former Cat Protection League charity shop has been vacant since 2018 when it was put up for sale. It is an elegant building in a prominent position on the edge of the town centre. It has a long garden which stretches 34 metres to the historic town wall. Although some details about tree removal need to be examined, this a good proposal that will bring a prominent empty retail unit back into use. It will continue the trend, nationwide as well as in Ludlow, of town centres becoming places to experience, linger over coffee or a meal, but purchase fewer goods. It will also provide more flats in the town centre. We need small dwellings like those proposed.

Roof terrace overlooking Church Walk would damage setting of St Lawrence’s Church and the Reader’s House

I have objected to plans to extend a third floor flat above Joules and the hospice shop, 9-10 King Street, with a north facing roof terrace. The balcony, which will be 10.5 metres (34ft) above ground level, would break up the established roofline. Residents or holidaymakers in the flat will overlook the bedroom windows of two of the new almshouses. They will gaze over the roof of the almshouses to St Lawrence’s Church and the 17th Century Reader’s House, both Grade I listed. Looking from Church Walk, the balcony will be in full view. It will also be seen from Tower Street. Legislation and case law make clear considerable importance and weight should be given to preserving the setting of listed buildings when making planning decisions. That is why this application should be rejected.

Shrewsbury shopping centres plummet in value by two thirds – Shropshire Council shrugs off the loss

The devaluation of the Pride Hill, Darwin and now defunct Riverside shopping centres within the Shrewsbury Loop will be a surprise to no one. But the collapse in value from £51m to £17.5m– 66 per cent – over three years is bigger than expected. It is one of the biggest, if not the biggest, retail devaluation seen anywhere in England in such a short period. Shropshire Council has shrugged this off as an expected devaluation. Deputy Council leader Steve Charmley said: “We were aware of the possible downturn in the fortunes of the high street – an issue compounded by COVID-19 – but it’s for exactly that reason that the purchase was made – so that we could manage and mitigate any downturn.” The Shrewsbury shopping centres are expected to provide a profit to council tax payers of just £434,000 this financial year. Less than one per cent return on the original investment. The council could have better spent our money on social housing.

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