New road safety work will include a calming scheme outside Ludlow Infants School in Sandpits

Shropshire Council intends to carry out fifteen road safety schemes around the county this year. The list includes long needed traffic calming outside Ludlow Infant and Nursery School in Sandpits Road. The decision follows site meetings where parents, governors and councillors have pressed the case for action to reduce the risk of accidents on this busy road. It is hoped that the work will take place in the autumn.

Another scheme to provide a crossing on Old Street for children and parents at St Laurence’s School is not yet scheduled and is likely to be some way off.

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Shropshire Council consults on big development sites at Ironbridge and Tern Hill, along with green belt sites at Cosford and Tong

Shropshire Council is conducting a review of its local plan. Last December, it consulted on sites for future employment and housing developments. On Monday, it launched a new consultation on three huge sites is wants to see developed, and one site it is uncertain about. Two of the sites, RAF Cosford and Tern Hill Barracks, are being promoted by the Ministry of Defence. A third is the now redundant Ironbridge Power Station. The fourth site, on green belt land beside the M54 at Tong, has been put forward by Bradford Estates.

The proposals for Cosford and Tong would remove 550 hectares of land from the green belt. This is top of more than 120 hectares of land the council is already proposing to de-designate as green belt land east of Bridgnorth and Shifnal. In all, 670 hectares of green belt land could be lost, equivalent to half the land area of Ludlow.

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Severn Rivers Trust wants to remove half of Linney Weir to promote fish migration on the Corve and Teme

Severn Rivers Trust has applied to remove part of the Linney Weir structure on the River Corve “to allow full and safe fish passage for migratory fish up and down the River Corve and Teme.” The trust aims to remove a nine metre section from the 18 metre stone weir. The stonework removed will be used as rip rap to protect the remaining weir and the banks of the Corve (19/02540/FUL).

This application is just in. There is no information about the impact of this work. The Linney Weir in within Ludlow Conservation Area and an assessment of heritage impact will be needed. The weir has been in place for at least two centuries. Taking out half the weir will increase the flow from the Corve to the Teme. That could help properties in Lower Corve Street. But will there be any consequential impact downstream on Temeside? Will the well-used footbridge over the Corve next to the weir be closed during the works and if so, for how long.

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Defeat! Bitter blow as planning inspector approves five bungalows on Sidney Road green

Since February, a Bristol based planning inspector has been examining an appeal for five independent living bungalows on the green space at the bottom of Sidney Road and Charlton Rise. On Thursday, she announced that the appeal had been allowed and gave the scheme planning permission.

The good news is that the scheme is for five affordable homes. The bad news is it will lead to the loss of a fine Norway Maple and much of an important green space. This decision is final and can only be revoked by the high court.

Although we need affordable homes, we also need to preserve the character of our town. This is an important gateway into Ludlow and we should be trying to improve the aesthetics. This bog standard scheme will not achieve that.

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Why is the county getting two more empty homes every week? We need urgent action

There is a rule of thumb in housing. It is much easier to give permission to build new homes, most of them on green fields, than to bring empty homes back into use. Empty homes are a growing problem here in Shropshire where the number of homes empty for at least six months is increasing at the rate of two a month. We have a bigger proportion of our housing stock empty than England as a whole.

There were 4,460 empty homes in Shropshire last year, 1,654 of which had been vacant for more than six months. The waiting list for social housing stood at 5,227 households at the beginning of the year. One effective way of reducing that would be to take urgent action to bring more empty homes into use. But Shropshire Council seems to have given up on empty homes.

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