Category: Ludlow

Roof terrace overlooking Church Walk would damage setting of St Lawrence’s Church and the Reader’s House

I have objected to plans to extend a third floor flat above Joules and the hospice shop, 9-10 King Street, with a north facing roof terrace. The balcony, which will be 10.5 metres (34ft) above ground level, would break up the established roofline. Residents or holidaymakers in the flat will overlook the bedroom windows of two of the new almshouses. They will gaze over the roof of the almshouses to St Lawrence’s Church and the 17th Century Reader’s House, both Grade I listed. Looking from Church Walk, the balcony will be in full view. It will also be seen from Tower Street. Legislation and case law make clear considerable importance and weight should be given to preserving the setting of listed buildings when making planning decisions. That is why this application should be rejected.

Car park charges back in Ludlow from Tuesday but no plans to reinstate park and ride service

Without any consultation with councillors, Shropshire Council is to reintroduce car parking charges across the county on Tuesday 14 July. This could not be worse timed. Ludlow is beginning to recover from lockdown but it is a long haul ahead. Social distancing is a challenge everywhere but more so in a historic town with narrow streets and pleasantly ancient pubs, restaurants and cafes. Free parking in the Galdeford and Smithfield car parks should be part of Ludlow’s offer over the summer. We councillors have been told that officers are “looking at how Park and Ride may support more fully and proposals are in development.” But there is no timetable for this. Not even an indication that the council is thinking about Ludlow’s park and ride service, which is unusable at present. There should be no additional car park charges this summer and certainly none until the park and ride is fully functional.

Consultation begins on plans for seven homes on Castle View Terrace field – it’s a controversial application

One of the great pleasures of Castle View Terrace is the view westwards over gardens and woodland. As you walk along the terrace, there is a feeling of being at the edge of the countryside. Especially at the far end of the cul de sac where a field often known as the medieval field lies behind a stone wall. It is a field where sheep may safely graze. But no longer. The paddock has been sold to Shropshire Homes, the company that is developing Fishmore Quarry, below Castle View Terrace. Shropshire Homes is planning seven homes on the field. It is consulting with nearby residents and the wider town over the plans. This proposal is not unexpected. We have been discussing it for a while. But development of this site is not welcome. The former Whittles depot should be developed instead.

Hospitality in Ludlow reopens this weekend – enjoy a cake and a beer (and take care) #ludlowisopen

Ludlow is at its best when the pubs throng with customer and the tables in its cafes and restaurants are full. When there is a crowd on King Street and a crush on the market. Being close to strangers has long been part of our national experience.  Shambling along the streets. Jostling at the bar in the pubs. Crowding into the markets. At pop concerts. Less pleasantly, on trains and queuing for toilets. From today, we can go to cafes and pubs. From Wednesday, Ludlow Market is expected to have more stalls. Being closer that one metre has been banned. Along with shaking hands and hugging friends. It won’t be Ludlow as normal. It will be close encounters and a strange kind. But life will begin to come back to our town centre. People should, of course, take care. Media headlines have concentrated abuse of lockdown rules. But most people in Ludlow have shown common sense during lockdown and I am sure they will continue to do so.  We should stay local and shop local.

King Street closure order has come into force – it’s closed to vehicles every Friday and Saturday for up to 18 months

The closure of King Street between 10am and 3pm today and tomorrow is a temporary measure. Initially it will be in place for 18 months but it can be cancelled at any point if it is causing disruption. The closure is to promote social distancing on one of our busiest streets for traffic and pedestrians. In ordinary times, pedestrians squeeze along the narrow pavements with their shopping bags and pushchairs. They frequently spill out into the road, as do the drivers of mobility scooters, where they compete with cars and vans for use of the narrow street. This congestion has always been hard to resolve because shops need deliveries, town centre residents require access to their homes and people coming into town to shop or eat need to park. Now the experimental closure to motorised vehicles is underway. We must see how it works.

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