Tag: Linney House houses

Will the proposed Linney House homes flood? We can’t tell from the flood risk assessment

Earlier today, I wrote about proposals for four detached homes in the grounds of Linney House. The development is on the banks of the Corve. But the flood risk assessment is based on the Teme which is 600 metres (660 yards) downstream of the site and around two metres lower. The flood risk assessment states the minimum ground level of the development will be 2.19m above modelled flood level of the Teme. That is not relevant. In October, the Corve was at a height of 3.7m. That potentially threatens one of the planned homes with flooding. A new flood risk assessment is needed based on local conditions.

Back to the future at Linney House as new application and threat lodged for four suburban detached houses

If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again. The attempt to build houses in the grounds of Linney House has become something of a saga. Initially plans were submitted for four detached suburban homes on this sensitive site back in 2012. That was reduced to three houses under pressure from council planners. That scheme gained permission in 2014 from a council under pressure from the government to approve housing. Three dwellings weren’t enough for the developer. In came a scheme for eight houses of a modern design in 2019. The design was good but the application ran into trouble from ecologists and conservationists. Now, plans have been submitted for four detached homes. They retain the modern design of the first 2019 application (19/05519/FUL).

Building work starts on Linney House but only for foundations of a garage

The world of planning is often bizarre. That’s the case with Linney House where a series of applications for houses in the grounds have met objections from residents and planners. But the developer, Linney House Developments, did gain planning permission in 2014 and 2017. Planning law says that developers must start work within three years on planning permission being granted. The current planning application for eight homes on the site has run into trouble with strong objections from Shropshire Council’s planning team. Yesterday, contractors moved onto the site to begin work. Alerted by concerned residents, I went to the site to check up on what was happening. Heras fencing is being erected, undergrowth cleared and foundations dug for a garage. That’s enough to stop the 2017 permission for three large houses expiring. Although work has started, there is no current intention of building this scheme. As I said, the world…

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In March, a new proposal was submitted to build eight homes of modern design in the grounds of Linney House. Now Shropshire Council’s planning officers have said the plans contravene planning policy and are likely to be refused. A letter sent to the site developer eight days ago is a lengthy 14 pages. But the message it conveys is clear. The environmental damage and harm to the Ludlow Conservation Area from the proposed scheme would be unacceptable. At most, three houses can be accommodated on the site and there is already permission for this. Shropshire Council is likely to reject the current application to increase the number of houses to eight. The planners’ letter does not mark the end of this seven-year attempt to build in woodland in the garden of the Grade II listed Linney House. The developer must decide whether to withdraw the current application or press ahead…

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Linney House development runs into trouble from heritage, highways, ecology, and a potential threat to otters

It is rare that an application for permission to build houses is straightforward. In Ludlow, it seems that is almost never the case. The application to build eight homes in a modern style in the grounds of Linney House is a case in point. This has been a much abused site over the years with permissions given that would not get through the tougher planning system in place today. Trees on the property have been felled without consent. This application, submitted to Shropshire Council last February, has now hit new stumbling blocks (19/00826/FUL). The scheme was already subject to an energetic complaint from the council’s tree officer. Highways officers said several matters must be resolved before planning permission is granted. Shropshire Council’s ecologists now say they are not happy with the plans. They are demanding more information to be assured that protected species are not damaged. They are concerned about…

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