Tag: planning

Roof terrace overlooking Church Walk would damage setting of St Lawrence’s Church and the Reader’s House

I have objected to plans to extend a third floor flat above Joules and the hospice shop, 9-10 King Street, with a north facing roof terrace. The balcony, which will be 10.5 metres (34ft) above ground level, would break up the established roofline. Residents or holidaymakers in the flat will overlook the bedroom windows of two of the new almshouses. They will gaze over the roof of the almshouses to St Lawrence’s Church and the 17th Century Reader’s House, both Grade I listed. Looking from Church Walk, the balcony will be in full view. It will also be seen from Tower Street. Legislation and case law make clear considerable importance and weight should be given to preserving the setting of listed buildings when making planning decisions. That is why this application should be rejected.

Consultation begins on plans for seven homes on Castle View Terrace field – it’s a controversial application

One of the great pleasures of Castle View Terrace is the view westwards over gardens and woodland. As you walk along the terrace, there is a feeling of being at the edge of the countryside. Especially at the far end of the cul de sac where a field often known as the medieval field lies behind a stone wall. It is a field where sheep may safely graze. But no longer. The paddock has been sold to Shropshire Homes, the company that is developing Fishmore Quarry, below Castle View Terrace. Shropshire Homes is planning seven homes on the field. It is consulting with nearby residents and the wider town over the plans. This proposal is not unexpected. We have been discussing it for a while. But development of this site is not welcome. The former Whittles depot should be developed instead.

Developer of Linney House lodges appeal before the latest two planning applications have been decided

At the end of last year, developer James Hepworth lodged yet another application for housing in the gardens of Linney House, this time for four homes. The previous application for eight homes lodged in March 2019 had not yet been decided. It still hasn’t been decided so Mr Hepworth has asked the planning inspectorate to decide the application. He is within his rights to do so but it takes the decision out of local democratic hands. I have asked for both applications to be considered by the Southern Planning Committee. In the instance of the eight homes now being appealed, the committee can only give an indicative opinion, the decision it would have made. This will be passed to the planning inspector in Bristol. I have rarely seen such a weak case for an appeal. The scheme is well designed and will be an attractive place to live. But it is the wrong place and is not needed in a town which already has planning permissions for nearly 750 unbuilt homes.

Six additional homes to be squeezed into the high density Fishmore Quarry development which lacks open space

Shropshire Homes has applied to squeeze more homes onto the former quarry site on Fishmore Road. It currently has approval for 73 homes and the plans are to add an extra five. This will give this a brownfield site a density of 43 dwellings a hectare. The Foldgate Lane greenfield development is by contrast a mere seven dwellings a hectare. Fishmore Quarry will provide just 4.5 sqm of accessible open space for each household. Foldgate Lane will have 850 sqm of accessible open space per household. It is a tale of two housing estates and a tale of our times. Urban brownfield developments are getting ever more crowded, often less attractive, while attractive spacious greenfield developments sprawl outwards across open countryside.

Planning permission expires for redevelopment of One Stop and the Post Office on Tower Street

One Stop, 9 Tower Street, which leases space to the Post Office, will not be redeveloped in the foreseeable future. The wannabe “developer”, an investment company, has not made any effort over the last three years to start the development. This has led to its planning permission expiring under national rules. Any new plans will have to start from scratch. I always suspected that this development wouldn’t happen. The property developer, Surrey based Machan Investments Ltd, is unknown in Ludlow. But its speculative application was submitted and after the usual debate it was approved. That permission has now failed and that could be bad news for Ludlow. We need regeneration of the Galdeford Corner. It should be a gateway to Ludlow. Attracting customers to Galdeford and Tower Street as a location in its own right. Preserving its convenience store and the Post Office.

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