Tag: Shropshire Council

Shropshire Council like many councils employs bailiffs to collect council tax arrears. Bristow and Sutor are its bailiffs of choice. In recent days, the bailiffs sent out a letter to 2,622 households who are behind with council tax payments. In a staggering display of incompetence, Bristow and Sutor sent the wrong letter and threatened to take possession of people’s goods to pay the bill. The letter should have asked for financial details and invited discussions on paying. Council leader Peter Nutting was clearly outraged. He demanded a compensatory payment to charity from Bristow and Sutor to a charity. £250. Yes, just £250. Less than ten pence for each letter. £250 is just half of one per cent of the company’s pre-tax profit in 2018/19.

As we begin our first weekend in Shropshire after lockdown, what is the role of Covid-19 Marshals and a plate of crisps?

Is a Scotch egg a substantial meal in a pub? Maybe not. Serve it with chips, it might be substantial. Two pints of lager and a packet of crisps does not count. But a plate of posh crisps with sides might just be substantial meal in premises that have “class and calibre”. Shropshire and Telford and Wrekin are both in Tier 2, High Alert areas. Alcohol can only be served with a substantial meal. Who enforces these regulations? The police have a role. And step forward the new phenomenon of Covid Secure Marshalls. Covid Marshalls for short. They are called Community Reassurance Teams here in Shropshire. This article looks at the role of marshals and the new regulations on drinking establishments required to serve a substantial meal with a drink. On 9 September, Boris Johnson announced: “We will boost the enforcement capacity of local authorities by introducing COVID Secure Marshalls to help ensure social distancing in town and city centres.” Councils and the police have been since been funded to help businesses and the public to engage Covid-compliant behaviour. Shropshire Council has received £145,151. Covid Marshals are tasked with ensuring that the public socially distance, do not gather beyond the…

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Covid Watch: Shropshire Council wants you to report on whether businesses are complying with rules while thinking of Swiss Cheese

Are you off to the pub tonight or are looking forward to a relaxed meal in your favourite restaurant? Maybe you are doing an evening shop. The weekend is coming and that will be a busy time for going to shops and venues. But is your experience safe? Are the publicans, restaurateurs, shopkeepers obeying and enforcing the rules on social distancing, providing sanitiser and wearing of face coverings. Shropshire Council wants to know. This invitation to shop on the shops may make some people will feel uncomfortable. Shropshire Council has a role alongside the police in enforcing and handing out fines. It is recruiting its citizens to spy on each other. Is that a good thing? I hope you are thinking of cheese when you keep local and shop local. The council wants you think of Swiss cheese when thinking about Covid-19.

Historic England recommends Shirehall should not be listed paving the way for its demolition and sale

Yesterday, Historic England issued a decision on the listing of Shirehall on Abbey Foregate. The secretary of state has decided not to list the 1960s civic building. He has said he is minded refusing a certificate of immunity to prevent the building being demolished but that is now a technicality unless there is a legal challenge to the refusal of listing. The decision will clear the way for the 10-acre site to be cleared for housing and Shropshire Council can put the money towards its shopping centres which very soon will have absorbed more than £60 million of public money. That money could have provided at least 250 social homes. But the council leadership is saddled with the centres which are only worth two-thirds of the money the council paid for them three years ago and that is its priority for spending.   Update: After I published this post the Twentieth Century Society published an article supporting the listing of Shirehall.

Shropshire Council Community Tree Scheme opens with 10,000 free trees – apply quickly (scheme closed)

Update. The scheme has now closed for this year due to unprecedented demand which saw all 10,000 trees requested during a matter of hours. Shropshire Council has launched its community tree scheme for 2020/21. It is getting quite late in the year so the scheme has been simplified. People and groups can apply for up to ten bundles, each of twenty trees. Four types of bundles are available: lowland woodland mix; upland woodland mix; wet woodland mix; and native hedgerow mix. There is a provisional closing date for the scheme of 14th December 2020. However, applications are processed on a first come first served basis and but the scheme may close earlier if all the available trees are allocated. The tree scheme is part of Shropshire Council’s ambition to plant a tree for every resident by 2050 – a minimum of 350,000 trees.

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