Category: Shropshire Council

Shropshire Council must support communities through a community lottery

Shropshire’s resilience lies in its communities so why won’t Shropshire Council support them? I proposed a community lottery in 2017 on behalf of the Lib Dem group. Council members votes to investigate the concept. But the proposal was kicked into touch by Shropshire Council’s deputy leader, Steve Charmley.   There is everything in favour of a community lottery. More than 100 councils already operate a community lottery. Some councils see it as a way of replacing the money they have cut from local budgets. Other just want to help communities in any way they can. Sadly, Shropshire Council looks to Shirehall not to our communities. That must change.

Bromfield Road pothole not fixed after more than three months – it’s a potential killer (with video)

Bromfield Road is one of the busiest roads in Ludlow, both with vehicle traffic and pedestrians going to and from Ludlow School. It is meant to be slow road, 20mph for the most part, but it is not a road that always feels safe. There are narrow pavements shadowed by trees that are crammed with students, especially in the afternoon at schools out. At times they spill out onto the poorly lit zebra crossing before traffic is fully at a halt. And now there is the pothole. Pothole is a misnomer. A crater up to 15cm deep has been forming around a drain cover for a long while. It is now dangerous. It is going to blow a tyre or wreck a wheel just as vehicles approach the zebra crossing, let alone the danger to cyclists. That could lead to a serious accident. Is this the most dangerous pothole in Shropshire? Sadly, I doubt it.

Conservatives admit they have struggled to turn around their “oil tanker” of a highways project

We often despair about the state of our highways. A bumpy ride has become the norm as potholes and road defects grow as fast as Shropshire Council can sort them out. Council leaders have been obsessive in their view that only the private sector can deliver quality highways work. Yet the experience in Shropshire of managing highway maintenance through major contactors has proved as jarring as driving on our roads. The initial 2011 contract with Ringway delivered poor quality and late maintenance. There were high hopes of improvement when Kier took over in 2018 but at a recent committee meeting council officers admitted the company is still struggling to deliver timely and quality work after three years. The Conservatives describe the task of getting improvements as being like turning an oil tanker around. Thank goodness they don’t run the Suez Canal!

Recycling rates have stagnated – here are five steps to recycling heaven in Shropshire

Shropshire Council is in the top fifty councils in England for recycling rates. It recycled 54.6 per cent of its waste in 2019/20 but that rate has not improved over the last five years. Though it’s good news we are among the high recyclers, there is never room for complacency when it comes to environmental matters. The council has become complacent. South Oxfordshire and the Vale of White Horse districts, both rural areas, recycle 63 to 64 per cent of their waste. Why can’t we do the same? Or better still, do better. The way recycling operates in Shropshire can and must be improved. Shropshire Council should set a target of being in the top ten of councils for recycling by 2026. We should aim for a minimum of two-thirds of our waste being recycled within five years.

Expanding Ludlow business could move operation to Wales after lack of council help

One of Ludlow’s most significant employers, Flowfit, is on the verge of signing a deal for expanding its business in Wales. This move comes after Shropshire Council has failed to help the company find a site in Ludlow. Simon Parsonage is Chief Executive of Flowfit, a market leader in everything hydraulic, from distribution to systems and manufacturing has been based on Ludlow Business Park and celebrates 25 years in business in June. At the beginning of the year, Simon contacted Shropshire Council’s Business Growth team. Flowfit has been expanding and wanted to expand further on an adjacent vacant site owned by Shropshire Council or a site close by. Although there were promises to help from council officers, after more than three months Flowfit has not received a valid response. It is now at the point of signing up to expanding on a site in Wales.

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