Category: Shropshire Council

Shropshire Council Community Tree Scheme opens with 10,000 free trees – apply quickly (scheme closed)

Update. The scheme has now closed for this year due to unprecedented demand which saw all 10,000 trees requested during a matter of hours. Shropshire Council has launched its community tree scheme for 2020/21. It is getting quite late in the year so the scheme has been simplified. People and groups can apply for up to ten bundles, each of twenty trees. Four types of bundles are available: lowland woodland mix; upland woodland mix; wet woodland mix; and native hedgerow mix. There is a provisional closing date for the scheme of 14th December 2020. However, applications are processed on a first come first served basis and but the scheme may close earlier if all the available trees are allocated. The tree scheme is part of Shropshire Council’s ambition to plant a tree for every resident by 2050 – a minimum of 350,000 trees.

No backing for Ludlow park and ride improvements from Shropshire Council but promise to look into anti-social behaviour

“There are no current plans for Ludlow park and ride site or connecting bus services, although it is recognised that an overall movement strategy for the town needs to be considered as part of the wider developments recently approved in the town.” That was the statement from Shropshire Council leader Peter Nutting at last Monday’s cabinet meeting. It was in response to a question from Shrewsbury councillor, David Vasmer, who at my request asked about Ludlow’s park and ride while pressing the leader on consultation about the proposed upgrading of Shrewsbury’s park and ride service. Although Peter Nutting said there are no plans for the park and ride site, he did promise to personally investigate the problems of anti-social behaviour. After the meeting though, he made it clear that he was not promising any action.

We need to protect views of historic Ludlow and landscapes across our county in the next local plan

Shropshire Council is currently discussing its approach to planning through to 2038. The latest consultation closed at the end of September. One of the arguments I have made is that we must protect the most important views across the county from being disrupted or destroyed by sprawl of housing and employment development. I am proposing that the revised local plan designates and protects key views of historic monuments and important landscapes across the county.

Shropshire Council is to relaunch its free community tree scheme

A year ago, I presented a motion to Shropshire Council calling for a county tree bank. The motion was carried. The idea was to seek a modest financial contribution from everyone who had to remove a tree but could not replace it. This would purchase trees to be given to suitable homes. The motion also asked the council to plant at least one tree for every resident by 2050 – a minimum of 350,000 trees. During the debate, councillors bemoaned the loss of the council’s popular community tree scheme, which had been dropped due to budget cuts. Now the scheme is coming back though in a different form this year. The council aims to plant 12,500 trees in copses and small areas of native woodland, and existing hedgerows to enhance the landscape and for wildlife value. Details of how to apply are not yet available.

Council leaders worried that Shirehall will be listed by Historic England apply for immunity certificate (updated)

Without informing councillors, Shropshire Council has applied for a certificate of immunity to protect its Shirehall headquarters from being listed. Councillors only heard about this yesterday. The consultation by Historic England ends on Friday. Council leader Peter Nutting has said the decision to apply for a certificate of immunity is not controversial as the council decision in July on the future of Shirehall was quite clear. But councillors did not agree to demolish Shirehall. They agreed to stop work on the ambitious and expensive plans to remodel Shirehall and explore developing a new civic centre in Shrewsbury town centre. Demolition was not discussed. The secret move to get a certificate of immunity is typical of the current council leadership’s approach. Councillors are informed on a need to know basis and, in Peter Nutting’s opinion, most councillors don’t need to know.

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