Tag: Fishmore Quarry Whittles

We are losing trees and biodiversity in and around Ludlow (2) – Fishmore Quarry

In my previous article, I railed against the planning system which serves us badly when it comes to protecting and enhancing biodiversity. In this article, I look in more detail at the Fishmore Quarry housing development where the one of Ludlow’s richest areas of biodiversity has been bulldozed. It is far from clear whether the tree and shrub clearance is within current planning consents, though the developer insists it is. What is clear is that technical changes to this scheme have led to a significant loss of biodiversity. One of the biggest losses we have seen in Ludlow. We can’t keep allowing this. We should not have allowed it here. Biodiversity can’t be instantly replaced by scattering seeds or planting quicks and saplings. Biodiversity areas take decades to mature. We must change the way we assess planning applications to ensure this doesn’t keep happening.

We are losing trees and biodiversity in and around Ludlow (1) – it’s a failure of the planning system

Foldgate Lane. Rocks Green. Fishmore Quarry. Just three of the development sites where trees, hedges and scrubland have been the victims of recent work as development in Ludlow accelerates. There is a lot of anger around Ludlow and Ludford. Why are we losing so much biodiversity? Where have things gone wrong? The primary fault lies in the planning system. It assumes that the destruction caused by bulldozing and chain saws can be replaced by planting schemes. The system doesn’t understand that biodiversity takes decades to emerge. And that it happens randomly. Biodiversity is a real scruff and that is why biodiversity works. It is the bugs and beasties as well as the tatty shrubs, along with the good looking trees that keep our world healthy. Most biodiversity is not protected in our planning system and many planning decisions seem blind to the destruction being caused. We must give far more respect and importance to biodiversity when we decide planning applications.

Moving towards a name for the Fishmore Quarry development – I propose to back “Raglan Quarry”

Over the last few days, we have been discussing online, by email and even face to face the best name for the proposed development of nearly 80 homes in the old quarry on Fishmore Road. I have also had a discussion with the developer to clarify some points. Quarry Place will be the marketing name only so there is freedom to select a new name. We agreed the name Quarry Place is unlikely to be accepted by Shropshire Council as a permanent name because of possible confusion with Quarry Gardens off Gravel Hill. That leaves us free to choose another name for the road and that will become the name of this new estate.

We are seeking a road name for the new housing estate to be built in Fishmore Quarry

Shropshire Homes has planning permission to build nearly 80 homes  in the former quarry on Fishmore Road. The development will be called Quarry Place. Most of the homes will be grouped around a cul de sac. Shropshire Council is seeking views from councillors on naming the road. One obvious answer is that it is called Quarry Place. But we could propose another name. I’d like to hear your suggestions before sending a selection to Shropshire Council later in the month.

Six additional homes to be squeezed into the high density Fishmore Quarry development which lacks open space

Shropshire Homes has applied to squeeze more homes onto the former quarry site on Fishmore Road. It currently has approval for 73 homes and the plans are to add an extra five. This will give this a brownfield site a density of 43 dwellings a hectare. The Foldgate Lane greenfield development is by contrast a mere seven dwellings a hectare. Fishmore Quarry will provide just 4.5 sqm of accessible open space for each household. Foldgate Lane will have 850 sqm of accessible open space per household. It is a tale of two housing estates and a tale of our times. Urban brownfield developments are getting ever more crowded, often less attractive, while attractive spacious greenfield developments sprawl outwards across open countryside.

Back to top