Category: Housing

More details of Sandpits refurbishment published by Connexus

Two planning applications have now been submitted for the major refurbishment of 77 homes on Sandpits Avenue (21/05057/FUL; 21/05056/FUL). They give more details of the scheme, which will be the largest investment in social housing in Ludlow for many years. Residents whose houses are being refurbished will be moved into another house in Sandpits. Their homes will have major refurbishment, new floors, new heating, new electrics, new bathrooms and kitchens, new plastering and new roofs where needed. The residents will move back to their original homes again at the end of the work. The housing will be more energy efficient but no renewable energy sources are proposed.

Connexus, the social housing association which absorbed South Shropshire Housing, is about to start a major refurbishment of housing on Sandpits Avenue. In all, 77 homes will be refurbished with new flooring, insulation and heating. Tracey Huffer, Shropshire Councillor for Ludlow East says: “It is great news that this work is getting underway at last. These houses are far behind modern standards but they are sound enough to last several decades once they have been refurbished. “The work will be disruptive but it will be worth the inconvenience to bring these aging properties up to modern standards. The properties will be far more energy efficient and the problems of damp will be got rid of. “The gardens will be undisturbed and that will be good news for residents who have worked hard to create lovely gardens. Several of the houses have aviaries and these will not be disturbed during construction.”

Consultation begins on plans for seven homes on Castle View Terrace field – it’s a controversial application

One of the great pleasures of Castle View Terrace is the view westwards over gardens and woodland. As you walk along the terrace, there is a feeling of being at the edge of the countryside. Especially at the far end of the cul de sac where a field often known as the medieval field lies behind a stone wall. It is a field where sheep may safely graze. But no longer. The paddock has been sold to Shropshire Homes, the company that is developing Fishmore Quarry, below Castle View Terrace. Shropshire Homes is planning seven homes on the field. It is consulting with nearby residents and the wider town over the plans. This proposal is not unexpected. We have been discussing it for a while. But development of this site is not welcome. The former Whittles depot should be developed instead.

Why is the county getting two more empty homes every week? We need urgent action

There is a rule of thumb in housing. It is much easier to give permission to build new homes, most of them on green fields, than to bring empty homes back into use. Empty homes are a growing problem here in Shropshire where the number of homes empty for at least six months is increasing at the rate of two a month. We have a bigger proportion of our housing stock empty than England as a whole. There were 4,460 empty homes in Shropshire last year, 1,654 of which had been vacant for more than six months. The waiting list for social housing stood at 5,227 households at the beginning of the year. One effective way of reducing that would be to take urgent action to bring more empty homes into use. But Shropshire Council seems to have given up on empty homes.

Sidney Road bungalows – Shropshire Council backs dissenting officer’s case in evidence to planning appeal

Housing group Connexus is appealing against the South Planning Committee’s rejection of its plans for five bungalows on the green at the bottom of Charlton Rise. The committee refused the scheme twice. In its evidence to the planning inspectorate, council planners revealed that they were divided on whether the scheme should be recommended for approval. One officer wrote a dissenting report which said that the scheme should be refused because of the loss of the Norway Maple, the reduction in open space and poor design. The South Planning Committee had no knowledge of this report when it rejected the application for the second time. But it said the plans must be refused because of the loss of the Norway Maple, the reduction in open space and poor design.

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