Dinham Hotel to close and be converted into apartments if plans approved

Dinham Hotel to close and be converted into apartments if plans approved

These plans have been long expected. One of our upmarket hotels is to be converted into residential accommodation.

The plans are to create seven dwellings, five in the hotel building and two in the grounds. There be only minor alterations to exterior of the building. Number 9 Dinham, currently Elliots Bistro will be converted back into an independent house.

This is a well thought out conversion. It will though be sad to lose this venue from Ludlow’s town centre.

I have never booked a room or had a meal at Dinham Hall but has long had a good reputation. The owner is retiring and Dovecot Properties has submitted a full planning application (20/04260/FUL), with a parallel application for Listed Building Consent (20/04261/LBC).

There will be no alterations to the exterior of the hotel. Internally, there will be several changes, including a new lift and staircase, to convert it to into five apartments. The two existing cottages in the grounds will be for two further dwellings. The property will be protected by electric gates. No 9 Dinham on the north edge of the site will be converted back into a separate property.

The existing 14 car parking spaces will be retained and a cycle store added. One EV charging point will be installed.

The occupiers will have access to a communal garden. All trees will be retained.

There will be few alterations to the exterior of the property, removal of signs and some ventilation, and insertion on one new window.

Dinham Hall is a Grade II-listed Georgian town house dating back to 1792. Pevsner’s The Buildings of England, Shropshire describes the building on page 386:

“Dinham hall Hotel, a fine compact Neoclassical house faced uniquely for Ludlow, with Grinshill ashlar. Built in 1792, for Samuel Nash, agent to Richard Payne Knight of Downton Castle. Three-stories, the entrance off-centre at the short end. The south front, towards the view, is of three wide bays and has a central full-height bow, with triple sashes for all three storeys. The walling between the windows in the bow is not stone-faced but rendered to reduce weight.”

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